The Wollemi Honours Program

Rationale

The Honours program is an enrichment and extension program primarily designed for students who are already excelling in their normal work. It provides wonderful opportunities for them to take their study to a much higher level, while pursuing an area of personal interest. The program is available in many subjects across Years 7-10, and all students may apply to participate.

Practicalities

  • Normally a boy will be accepted into no more than two Honours programs each year. Particularly strong, self-motivated and organised students may discuss with the Director of Studies the possibility of attempting more.

  • Boys who complete their Honours assignment at a high standard and maintain their normal class work at an A or B level will qualify for Honours I. Those with a lower standard of achievement in Honours or in class work (a C or lower) will qualify for Honours II.

  • Honours I will be recognised in the boys’ school reports and in the awarding of a certificate and prize at the end-of-year presentation night.

  • Honours II will be recognised in the boys’ school reports and in the awarding of a certificate.

  • All Honours assignments are due no later than the end of Term 3.

  • If you are interested in participating in an Honours course, please complete the application form and submit it to me.

Brett Wright

Director of Studies


English

The English Honours Program is aimed at students who have a love of English and have a significant proficiency in it.

Between two to four students per year group will be eligible for the Honours Program with preference given to those who have achieved an A grade, or Primary equivalent, in the previous semester. The final decision as to who is accepted in the program rests with the Head of English.

Students involved will be given some class time to work on their projects and to consult with their mentor (their English teacher). They will also be excused from some of the regular homework writing tasks.

This year there are five suggested options: a short story, a suite (collection) of poems, an extended analytical essay, entry into an external competition (TBA), or devising your own project, in consultation with your English teacher.

What are the details?

Short story on a topic of your choice

  • Minimum length: Yr 7 and 8: 2500 words; Yr 9 and 10: 4000 words.
  • Other requirements:
- submit a rough draft during the course
        - research the craft of writing
           - submit a reflection statement of 500 words, describing the process you went through to write your story and what
  you learnt about writing along the way.

A suite of poems

  • On a topic or series of related topics of your choice.
  • Length: Yr 7 and 8: 1500 words; Yr 9 and 10: 2000 words.
  • Other requirements:
        - submit a rough draft during the course
        - research the craft of writing
           - submit a reflection statement of 500 words, describing the process you went through to write your poems and what
  you learnt about writing along the way.

-    

Extended Analytical Essay- genre study

  • Choose a literary genre that you love to read, such as fantasy or historical fiction.
  • Read two novels in this genre.
  • Write an essay in which you show how these novels follow or perhaps even subvert (deliberately not follow) the normal pattern of this genre.
  • Length: Yr 7: 1500 words; Yr 8: 2000 words; Yr 9: 2500 words; Yr 10: 3000 words.

Yes, this is challenging, but I really want to prepare our best writers for the challenges that are ahead, both in school and in life.

Please see your English teacher to learn more...

Mr Brett Wright

Head of English



“Η ύπατη μορφή καθαρής σκέψης είναι στα μαθηματικά”~ Plato

MATHEMATICS

 

INTRODUCTION

Honours in Mathematics is run during Terms 2 and 3.

Any student, from year 7 – 10, may apply for Mathematics Honours. However, by its very nature, a liking for Mathematics as well as an aptitude for this subject will help greatly.

Students selected to participate in Mathematics Honours must have achieved the following standards during Term 1:

~ ‘A’ for Application

~ ‘A’ for Behaviour

~ ‘A’ for Homework

~ ‘A’ for Achievement (80% average for all Term 1 or Term 2 assessments)

SYNOPSIS

The Honours class sets out to foster an interest in and an awareness of the power of Mathematics. A desire to succeed in solving mathematics problems enables boys to reach their own levels of excellence.

Topics are deliberately chosen from areas of mathematics which are distinct from the mainstream coursework. By the very nature of Mathematics, however, the work dealt with can only enhance boys’ prospects in Mathematics classes.

Above all else, Mathematics Honours is a subject aimed at having fun and gaining enjoyment.

OUTCOMES

On successful completion of their semester in Mathematics Honours, students should, optimally be able to satisfy the following outcomes:

~             Select efficient strategies and use them accurately to solve unfamiliar multi-step problems

~             Use and interpret formal definitions and generalizations when explaining solutions

~             Use deductive reasoning in presenting clear and concise mathematical arguments and formal proofs

~             Synthesise Mathematical techniques, results and ideas from their mainstream course and apply them appropriately to unfamiliar contexts as required in the Honours course

~             Develop and use sophisticated processes for exploring relationships, checking solutions and giving reasons to support conclusions

~             Reflect on experiences and critical understanding to make connections with, and generalizations about, existing knowledge and understanding

~             Make connection with the use of Mathematics in the real world by identifying where, and how, particular ideas and concepts are used

YEAR 7 HONOURS

Students in year 7 who participate in the mathematics honours program will engage in a short course developed by the maths department at Wollemi College that focuses on the world of Archimedean solids.

Archimedes (287 B.C. – 212 B.C.) was an ancient Greek mathematician, physicist, engineer, inventor and astronomer. He made several important discoveries in fields such as geometry, mainly in his applications of infinitesimals, which is often regarded as an early anticipation of modern calculus. He also derived an approximate for pi and was one of the first scholars to apply mathematics to physical phenomena.

This honours program will deal with topics including:

  • Archimedean solids
  • Estimation of volume for sophisticated shapes
  • Calculations of surface area
  • Mathematics and relevant history
  • Geometrical calculations
  • Physical construction

The honours program will begin at the start of week 5, Term 1, and will be due in the last week of Term 3.

STUDENT INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Pick one of the following Archimedean solids:

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Write a 100 word introduction on the life and interests of Archimedes, as well as a 200 word essay as a summary of one discovery (of their choosing) which Archimedes made.
  2. Using balsa wood, construct a model of your chosen solid, using a side length of 70 mm.
  3. Estimate the volume of the solid, clearly explaining how you have estimated this. Discuss two other possible methods of estimating the volume.
  4. Calculate the surface area.
  5. Construct a detailed and accurate net of the solid on A3 paper.
  6. Research the dihedral angles.
  7. The constructed solid should be stained, lacquered or painted. 
  8. Bonus marks will be awarded to students that construct a polyhedron plinth for the solid to stand on.
  9. All work must be submitted in a folder.

 

 

 

 

 

YEAR 8 HONOURS

Outline for the year 8 program is exactly the same as for the year 7 program.

STUDENT INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Pick one of the following Archimedean solids:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Write a 100 word introduction on the life and interests of Archimedes, as well as a 200 word essay as a summary of one discovery (of their choosing) which Archimedes made.
  2. Using balsa wood, construct a model of your chosen solid, using a side length of 70 mm.
  3. Estimate the volume of the solid, clearly explaining how you have estimated this. Discuss two other possible methods of estimating the volume.
  4. Calculate the surface area.
  5. Construct a detailed and accurate net of the solid on A3 paper.
  6. Research the dihedral angles.
  7. The constructed solid should be stained, lacquered or painted. 
  8. Bonus marks will be awarded to students that construct a polyhedron plinth for the solid to stand on.
  9. All work must be submitted in a folder.

 

YEAR 9 AND 10 HONOURS

Students in year 9 and 10 who participate in the Mathematics Honours program will engage in a short course designed by the University of Canberra that focuses on the influence Carl Gauss has had on the world of Mathematics.

Johann Carl Friedrich Gauss (30 April 1777 – 23 February 1855) was a German mathematician and scientist who contributed significantly to many fields, including number theory, statistics, analysis, differential geometry, geodesy, geophysics, electrostatics, astronomy and optics.

Sometimes referred to as "the foremost of mathematicians" and "greatest mathematician since antiquity," Gauss had a remarkable influence in many fields of mathematics and science and is ranked as one of history's most influential mathematicians. He referred to mathematics as "the queen of sciences."

The Gauss series is designed for interested and talented students in Years 9 and 10.

This Series comprises elementary geometry, similarity, Pythagoras' Theorem, elementary number theory, counting techniques and miscellaneous challenge problems.

Students will receive a notebook and a question book that contains 12 challenging problems. Each Student Notes book provides advice to students on how to approach the topics covered in that particular book.

STUDENT INSTRUCTIONS

      1.     Before attempting the problems in this booklet, work through the appropriate sections of the Student Notes. (First read the “Advice to Students” page at the beginning of the Student Notes in each Series.)

 2.  Solutions to the problems must be completely your own work. You may use resources such as text books or library books but not seek help from other people. A calculator or a computer may be used, but be sure that    any programs used are fully and carefully explained.

 3.  Submit careful solutions to these problems according to the schedule provided by your Maths Honours Director.

 4.  Each problem will be scored out of four marks. Marks will be awarded for clearly expressed arguments and careful reasoning. It is important to submit partial solutions to problems you have not completed as these may be worth some marks.

If there are circumstances when students cannot proceed, perhaps because of language or terminology, then teachers may give some guidance. Further general problem solving strategies may be discussed.

HONOURS 1

Honours 1 will be awarded to students who have:

~             Achieved a grade of Credit or greater awarded by the University of Canberra

~             Obtained an ‘A’ for Application in Mathematics in their report for Term 2 and 3

~             Obtained an ‘A’ for Behaviour in Mathematics in their report for Term 2 and 3

~             Obtained an ‘A’ for Homework in Mathematics in their report for Term 2 and 3

  ~             Obtained an ‘A’ for Achievement in Mathematics in their report for Term 2 and 3 (80% average for all Term 2 and 3 assessments)

HONOURS 2

Honours 2 will be awarded to students who have:

~             Achieved a grade of Pass awarded by the University of Canberra

~             Obtained an ‘A’ for Application in Mathematics in their report for Term 2 and 3

~             Obtained an ‘A’ for Behaviour in Mathematics in their report for Term 2 and 3

~             Obtained an ‘A’ for Homework in Mathematics in their report for Term 2 and 3

  ~             Obtained a ‘B’ for Achievement in Mathematics in their report for Term 2 and 3 (70% average for all Term 2 and 3 assessments)

Exceptions to these guidelines will be made under special circumstances and at the discretion of the Head of the Mathematics Department and the Director of Studies in consultation with each other.

 

Visual Arts

Course description

  • Honours students are required to design their own artmaking project, choosing an expressive form and subject matter that they wish to focus on.
  • Students must submit a project proposal outlining what they intend to submit for their project.
  • It is also expected that students work on their project independently at home between honours classes.
  • The projects will be marked on the resolution (quality) and conceptual strength represented in the work.
  • Students must apply in writing, explaining a) what expressive form they wish to work in and b) the concept for their honours project. Occasional classes will be run during mass/reading.

PROJECT PROPOSAL - ART HONORS

Explain your project proposal in up to 20 lines, outlining the Expressive form that you wish to work in, and the Subject matter that your work will explore. Also identify the number of works that you intend to submit. You will receive written feedback on your proposal from your teacher.

Mr Joe Tabone

Science

WHY IS IT SO ?

Why not follow in the steps of the great scientists and do your own original experiment?

To help you work out which experiment you want to do:

1. Visit CSIRO Crest at http://www.csiro.org/resources/ps1rb.html#registration

2. Work through the Crest Quiz ...it will suggest some possible experiments for you.

3. Present a one A4 size page proposal of the experiment/s you wish to perform to your Science Teacher.

4. After consultation move forward to your experiment.

5. If your completed assignment is awesome, we will enter it into the BHP Billiton Science Award

Mr Phil McKenzie

Design and Technology

A woodwork project of the students choice that addresses a real need ie. designing and making something that is of real use to them or someone else. The project proposal will need to be discussed with Mr Tabone first.

 

Spanish

Please see Mr Williams.


History

Years 7 & 8

Inquiry Question:

 “What was the role of the Pharaohs in Ancient Egypt and what was their relationship with the Gods?”

History Honours is a course which is designed to enhance the students’ understanding, knowledge and skills in the study of History.  History Honours builds on both the Mandatory and Elective History courses which are taught to all Wollemi students from Years 7-10.

 History Honours seeks to:

  • foster independent learning in a  small group environment’ develop skills in locating, researching/analysing, selecting and organising relevant primary and secondary source historical information;
  • Enhances written and oral communication skills in the presentation of relevant historical information;
  • Engages students in the use of a variety of information and communication technologies;
  • Engenders a keen interest in History just for the love of the subject.

 

Students will research the above inquiry question dealing with the following investigative areas:

  •  What was the Pharaoh’s role in Government, social life, religion and leisure?
  • How were the Pharaohs seen by the general public?
  • Did the Pharaohs involve themselves in the everyday lives of their subjects?
  • What were the responsibilities and privileges of the Pharaohs?

ASSESSMENT

Assessment Task 1 requires that students work independently in the composition of a virtual website that deals effectively with the enquiry question within the parameters of the areas of investigation outlined above.  The virtual website need not function as an actual website, but should include the following elements:

  •  A home page promoting the site and displaying links to specific areas of the enquiry question with which the site deals;
  • The link pages provide relevant information on specific areas of inquiry;
  • A bibliography of sources used in the composition;
  • Assessment must be submitted on disc/USB.

 

Years 9 and 10

Inquiry Question

“Explain the nature and structure of Ancient Persian society and the role of the king in the running of the empire and War?”

STAGE 5 HISTORY HONOURS COURSE

History Honours is a course which is designed to enhance the students’ understanding, knowledge and skills in the study of History.  History Honours builds on both the Mandatory and Elective History courses which are taught to all Wollemi students from Years 7 – 10.

History Honours seeks to;

*        foster independent learning in a small group environment

*        develop skills in locating, researching/analysing, selecting and organising relevant primary and secondary source historical information

*        enhance written and oral communication skills in the presentation of relevant historical information

*        engage students in the use of a variety of information and communication technologies

*        engender a keen interest in History just for the love of the subject.

                           

Students will research the above inquiry question dealing with the following investigative areas;

  • Who was King Xerxes?
  • What were the responsibilities and privileges of the King?
  • What was the nature of Persian Society
  • What was the Pharaoh’s role in Government, infrastructure  and expansion of the empire
  • What were Xerxes military achievements?

 

ASSESSMENT AND FEEDBACK

Assessment task : requires that students work independently in the composition of a Power point presentation that deals with the enquiry questions to be investigated for both Stage 4 and Stage 5 and includes the following elements;

•             A visual representation with relevant text that gives a summary of the topic.

•             Including relevant information on specific areas of inquiry

•             A bibliography of sources used in the composition 

•             assessment must be submitted electronically on disc or USB with a commentary lasting 5-7 minutes


Music

Year 7

Topics: Basic Elements of Music. Orchestral Instruments. Keyboard Instruments.

Students are to complete 1 task for Performance, 1 task for Composition and 1 task for Musicology from the list below.

Performance:

(a)  Perform on any instrument a piece of at least 16 bars. Both treble and bass clefs to be used.

(b)   Perform on any instrument a piece of at least 32 bars. Treble clef only.

(c)    Perform on any instrument a piece of at least 32 bars. Bass clef only.

Composition:

       (a) Compose a short piece of music up to 8 bars in any key, using treble AND bass clef

       (b) Compose a piece of music of at least 16 bars, using treble OR bass clef.

Compositions can be submitted in notation by hand or using computer programs such as Sibelius, which is available for use at school.

Musicology:

(a)   Research task on a musician of your choice. Must be minimum of 300 words and include at least the following information:           

i. Date of birth

            ii. Date of death (if applicable)

            iii. Instruments Played

            iv. Brief history of musical career

            v. Discography

            vi. Influences

            vii. How music was influenced by your chosen musician

            viii. Bibliography

(b)   Research task on an instrument of your choice. Must be minimum of 300 words and include at least the following information:            i. Origins of the instrument

            ii. Construction & parts of the instrument

            iii. Typical repertoire of the instrument

            iv. Techniques used to play the instrument

            v. What effect does the instrument have on music?


Year 8

Topic: Music for Film and Television

Choose any combination of Performance and/or Composition activities that =100%

Performance:

(a)   20% - Perform on any instrument a short theme up to 8 bars from a TV show or movie.

(b)   60%- Perform on any instrument a piece from a TV show or movie at least 32 bars.

(c)    20% Participation in the secondary choir.

Composition:

    (a) 20%- Compose a short piece of character music up to 8 bars.

You will need to think carefully about the use of musical concepts, in particular;

melody, instruments, rhythm and volume.

Select a character from the following list: An alien, a thief, a robot, a comedian, a clown, a stalker,

a private investigator, a cowboy, an elephant.

    (b) 60%- Compose a piece of character music at least 32 bars.

You will need to think carefully about the use of musical concepts, in particular;

melody, instruments, rhythm and volume.

Select a character from the following list: An alien, a thief, a robot, a comedian, a clown, a stalker,

a private investigator, a cowboy, an elephant.

Compositions can be submitted in notation by hand or using computer programs or recordings of your composition can be submitted.